Testosterone


Men's Health
Testosterone Treatments Miami Dr Mahl GenLife

Testosterone, the chief male hormone, is essential for libido and erectile function, and plays a crucial role in mood, energy, bone health, and body composition.

Testosterone levels decline with age, usually beginning in a man’s mid-30s. Diminishing testosterone levels have been linked with disorders such as depression, fatigue, obesity, and cognitive decline.

Low testosterone levels increase the risk of coronary heart disease as well as all-cause and cardiac mortality.

Restoring testosterone to youthful levels offers men a wealth of health benefits, including benefits for heart health, body composition, mood, and memory.

Bioidentical testosterone has not been found to have adverse effects on the healthy prostate gland—in fact, it may help improve prostate symptoms in men with low-normal testosterone levels. Testosterone therapy is contraindicated in men with prostate cancer.

Regular blood testing can help you and your physician decide if testosterone therapy is right for you. Optimizing testosterone levels requires a multi-pronged approach that includes optimal diet, proper nutrition, nutritional supplements, exercise, and bioidentical testosterone, if necessary.

Testosterone appears to affect fat cell metabolism and fat loss in several ways through:

  1. Inhibiting fat storage by blocking a key enzyme called lipoprotein lipase that is necessary for the uptake of fat into the body’s fat cells. When fat cells are exposed to testosterone in a test tube, the activity of lipoprotein lipase is dramatically reduced.
  2. Stimulating fat burning by increasing the number of certain receptors on the fat-cell membrane that release stored fat.
  3. Increasing insulin sensitivity and improving lipid and insulin metabolism, while enhancing growth of muscle fibers and decreasing fat deposits.

All of these effects benefit body composition by promoting lean body mass and reducing fat mass.

CLOMID for men
Low testosterone in men may be caused by problems in the testes (or gonads). This is called primary hypogonadism and can be brought on by the mumps, testicular trauma, or testicular cancer, etc., and can only be treated with testosterone replacement therapy. However, the more common causes of low testosterone/hypogonadism result from problems in the pituitary gland and/or hypothalamus in a man’s brain. Low testosterone levels caused by such “brain problems” are collectively described as secondary hypogonadism or hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and may result from depression/anxiety, head trauma, iron overload, anabolic steroid overdosing, diabetes, sleep deprivation, or some medications. Traditionally, if low testosterone is diagnosed, testosterone replacement therapy is prescribed, and it most commonly comes in the form of a cream, gel, pellet, patch, and by injection. And although these types of therapy are effective, some methods are better than others, and there are side-effects with all of them. For example, testicular shrinkage, gynecomastia (breast enlargement), low sperm count/sterility, and polycythemia (overproduction of red blood cells) are common side-effects of testosterone replacement therapy (for many sufferers, these side-effects are mostly treatable or considered “worth it” by the patient). However, specifically due to the sterility side-effect, such testosterone treatments aren’t a good option for younger men who want to have children. In these (usually young) hypogonadal men and/or human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) have been used for decades to increase testosterone production, increase sperm production, and increase fertility. Both these therapies effectively help signal the testes to produce testosterone and thereby increase testosterone levels (assuming of course the cause of the initial problem is not in the testes’ ability to make testosterone). In a healthy male, the pituitary gland in the brain releases luteinizing hormone (LH) into the blood stream, which signals the testes to “GO” and produce testosterone. After testosterone has been produced it naturally converts to some estrogen (yes, there’s estrogen in men too) and this estrogen acts as a “STOP” signal to the pituitary to stop making LH. It is a delicate system of checks and balances which I have simplified here for our purposes.
Clomid works by blocking estrogen at the pituitary and hypothalamus. Thus, the usual estrogen message to “STOP” production of LH is essentially silenced, and therefore the pituitary makes more LH and there is an increased “GO” signal to produce testosterone in the testes. HCG works by mimicking LH, which also increases the “GO” signal to produce more testosterone in the testes. Prescribing testosterone for a man, however, does the opposite of what HCG do.
With traditional testosterone replacement therapy, the brain (hypothalamus and pituitary) gets the message that there is plenty of testosterone being made in the testes, so much so that it doesn’t need to make anymore. Subsequently, the pituitary stops producing LH, and the natural production of testosterone (and sperm) in the testes ceases, which is why traditional testosterone replacement results in testicular shrinkage and low sperm count…a man’s testosterone and sperm manufacturing plant is essentially shut off.
HCG does not turn off the testosterone manufacturing plant but rather turn it back on or reboot it. While some hypogonadal men require continuous use for others it can be used for a 3-6 month time period and then discontinued. And, the checks and balances system is not interrupted, so there aren’t the testosterone replacement side-effects which occur due to intentional or unintentional testosterone overdosing. Most interestingly, although it used to be thought that HCG only worked on young men, in the past decade or so it has been used effectively in older men too.

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